What can I expect my employer to do to take into account my disability?

You can expect your employer to make 'reasonable adjustments' to working arrangements and policies, as well as physical aspects of a workplace if, without these, you would be placed at a disadvantage compared to individuals who are not disabled.

The duty is owed to you as an individual. In particular, this means that you should be properly consulted, and that any adjustments should be appropriate to your needs.

In assessing what is reasonable, consideration is given to factors such as: how practicable it is for the employer to make the adjustments and the extent to which these could disrupt the employer's business activities; the financial and other costs; and the availability of financial or other arrangements to support the changes.

The fact that non-disabled workers don’t benefit from the same adjustment is irrelevant to the question of whether it is reasonable or not.

If you want your employer to make adjustments to take account of your disability, you must make sure your employer knows about your disability. Speak to your rep about the best way of disclosing that you have a disability. Many specialist disabled charities and other support organisations will also be able to help you with this. For example, employment support service Remploy has a page on talking to your employer about your disability.

Assistance with the cost of adjustments may be available through the Access to Work scheme. You cannot be made to pay for the cost of adjustments.

Note: This content is provided as general background information and should not be taken as legal advice or financial advice for your particular situation. Make sure to get individual advice on your case from your union, a source on our free help page or an independent financial advisor before taking any action.