What are my disability rights?

Under the Equality Act 2010, you have the following rights:

  • You have the right for someone who cares for or associates with you not to be harassed or treated negatively because of your disability. For example, it would be against the law to harass someone because they have to take extra time off due to their child’s disability.
  • You have the right not to be treated less favourably than others because of your disability (direct discrimination). For example, it would be against the law for your employer to refuse you a customer-facing role because you have a disfigurement.
  • Your employer, or possible future employer, has a duty to make 'reasonable adjustments' to eliminate disadvantages arising because of your disability, so as to enable you to work. For example, if you are a wheelchair user, it would be a reasonable adjustment for your employer to provide a ground floor office for you if there is a suitable one available.
  • Your employer must not treat you unfavourably for a reason relating to your disability, unless that behaviour can be justified (discrimination arising from disability). For example, to dismiss you because of a lengthy disability-related absence would be unfavourable treatment relating to your disability. It would be unlawful disability discrimination unless your employer can justify the decision to dismiss by showing that first they made all the reasonable adjustments that could have helped you return to work.
  • Harassment and victimisation on grounds of disability are unlawful, as are instructions or pressure to discriminate.
Note: This content is provided as general background information and should not be taken as legal advice or financial advice for your particular situation. Make sure to get individual advice on your case from your union, a source on our free help page or an independent financial advisor before taking any action.