I'm not being provided with the proper training to do my job. What can I do?

If you have not had the training you need to do your job, both you and your company will suffer from poorer performance. It is important that you raise your concerns about this. If you fail to do your job as required, you could face disciplinary proceedings or even dismissal on the grounds of capability. Lack of training could also give rise to health and safety concerns.

If you are a union member, talk to your union rep about your training needs. There may be a Union Learning Rep (ULR) at your workplace. If so, ask for their help. Find out more from the Unionlearn website, the learning and skills organisation of the TUC. ULRs work with you and with the employer to make sure you can access the training and skills you need.

In addition, talk to fellow colleagues about training they have had. Find out the company’s policy on training for your job. Talk to your manager. If you do not get a satisfactory answer informally, you may have to go through your organisation's formal grievance procedure.

There are also some statutory rights you should be aware of. If you work in an organisation with 250 employees or more, you have a statutory right to ask for unpaid time off for study or training.

If you have left school and are aged 16 to 17, you have a legal right to reasonable paid time off to pursue further studies if you have not achieved a specific level of qualifications while at school. The right is found in section 63A of the Employment Rights Act 1996 and the Right to Time off for Study or Training Regulations 1999.

For more information about your rights in relation to training, see our Training section.

Note: This content is provided as general background information and should not be taken as legal advice or financial advice for your particular situation. Make sure to get individual advice on your case from your union, a source on our free help page or an independent financial advisor before taking any action.