Am I entitled to holiday pay at my part-time job?

All workers above school leaving age are entitled to a minimum of 5.6 weeks' paid leave (28 days for a full-time worker). The pay you receive should be the same as for a normal week's work.

Part-time workers' entitlement to holiday is pro rata – so if you normally work three days a week instead of five, you get 16.8 days a year (i.e. three-fifths of 28 days).

For workers with no normal working hours, such as casual workers, a week's pay equals the average weekly pay over a 12-week period, including overtime and overtime rates.

You may need to wait until you have worked enough days to accrue your holiday before you are allowed to take it. For example, if you have only been in the job one month, you may only be allowed to take one twelfth of your annual holiday allowance. To take a longer break, you would need to work longer to save up enough leave.

This entitlement may or may not include public and bank holidays. If you have a rather mean employer, they may decide that bank holidays form part of your 5.6 weeks leave, rather than count them as an extra day off.

Even if you do get public and bank holidays on top of your leave entitlement, there is not necessarily any entitlement to be paid for these days, so you should check your contract to see what you are due.

Note: This content is provided as general background information and should not be taken as legal advice or financial advice for your particular situation. Make sure to get individual advice on your case from your union, a source on our free help page or an independent financial advisor before taking any action.