What happens after the interview?

Before you leave the interview room, make sure the interviewer has told you know what the next step will be, when they’ll be in touch with you or when you need to contact them.

It’s worth writing the interviewer a very quick email to thank them for their time (nothing needy or pushy, mind). Extending a bit of old-fashioned courtesy might just tip the balance in your favour if there is nothing to choose between you and another candidate who doesn’t bother.

Don’t call them before the time they promised to get back to you – this could come across as pestering. If they haven’t got back to you by then, make a polite enquiry about whether a decision has been made, and if not whether they have a particular deadline in mind.

There’s no more you can do now but wait, so try to forget about it and get on with other things. There are other jobs out there, and this is the time to be chasing those. 

If you are turned down, ask for feedback so you can work out what you can improve in future interviews. This way you can salvage some valuable learning from disappointing rejection. Employers aren’t legally required to give feedback, but since candidates have put themselves through a lot to get to this final stage of the process, it’s generally regarded as good practice  if not common courtesy  to tell them how they did.

If they do offer you the job, there’s still one final hurdle to get over – the dreaded salary negotiation. Check out our advice on how to secure a decent pay deal on the workSMART blog and you’ll be starting an exciting and hopefully well remunerated new chapter of your working life in no time! 

Note: This content is provided as general background information and should not be taken as legal advice or financial advice for your particular situation. Make sure to get individual advice on your case from your union, a source on our free help page or an independent financial advisor before taking any action.